Touch

March 12, 2016 at 7:25 pm  •  1 Comment

By

“Touch has a memory.”

John Keats

PHEW! I intended to shoot an After [the] Blab segment in response to our 3/6/16 #CancerBlab, Single with Cancer, on Monday; however, the daily kicked in Monday morning [and] the To-Do[s] gave way to the Must-Do[s]. It happens, right?

Our guest was Tracy Maxwell, @TracyMax, author of Being Single, with Cancer [and] my, oh my, we had an excellent discussion. From social isolation [and] emotional wellbeing to identifying needs [and] accepting help. I think it’s fair to say it’s a must watch replay.

In her book, Tracy writes about the importance of touch [and] how compassionate touch seemed to drop out of her life after she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. People were afraid to touch her for whatever reason.

This loss, and it is a loss, puzzled me. In fact, it was foreign to me as this is something that I did not experience when I had Ewing’s Sarcoma. So, what was the critical difference between mine and Tracy’s lived experiences with cancer?

Here it is: I was a child with cancer.

We hug our children; we hold their hands; we snuggle up with them on the couch; we place a gentle hand on them as they persevere through the nausea and vomiting; we kiss their cheeks [and] wipe their tears. We touch our children.

Touch has memory [and] they will never forget it.

My question to you is why do we not touch adults?

I’d love to hear your thoughts, so feel free to leave a comment or shoot me an email at sdzhappy@gmail.com.

One Comment

  1. Anti-Cancer Club
    Anti-Cancer Club / March 15, 2016 at 11:27 am /Reply

Leave a Reply

*

Get weekly anti-cancer health tips!

Get weekly anti-cancer health tips!

 

One idea a week. Use it. Own it. Transform your life!

Thank You!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This